Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road together are part of a critical route connecting Wellington city to the northern suburbs and the wider region.

It is the busiest bus route outside the city centre, with more than 6,000 people travelling through by bus on an average day. It is also the busiest route in the city for people biking to and from work, with up to 1,300 people biking through on an average day. A mix of commercial, industrial, retail and educational services, alongside some residential properties, are located along Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road.

Thorndon Quay begins at the intersection of Mulgrave Street, just north of the Lambton Quay Bus Interchange, and extends northwards to the intersection with Tinakori Road, where Hutt Road begins.

Hutt Road runs parallel to State Highway 1 and the North Island main railway line until it connects to Centennial Highway at the bottom of Ngauranga Gorge. The whole length of the combined route is approximately 5km; Thorndon Quay is approximately 1km and Hutt Road 4km long.

The Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road May-June engagement used a map based platform where people could leave their feedback on specific locations.
 

You can view their comments here.

Projects previously proposed on Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road were led by Wellington City Council and focussed primarily on cycleways and shared footpaths.

We’ve taken the feedback on board, and also identified some new issues we think need to be considered in the design of options for improvements to this area.

Key issues on this route relate to:

  • Public transport (buses)
  • Cycling facilities
  • Walking and the street environment, including crossings
  • Parking
  • Volume of traffic and the speed of vehicles
  • Ngauranga / Jarden Mile Interchange
  • Ferry terminal and Port access

The objective of this project is to make travel by bus a faster and more reliable choice for people travelling to and through the central city; and provide a safer environment for people walking and on bikes.

This project helps us make a start on moving more people with fewer vehicles. By making travel by bus to and through the central city faster and more reliable, and creating a better environment for people walking and on bikes, we’ll give people more choices about how they get around.

In developing a long-term plan for Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road, we are exploring options to improve bus priority in both directions, improve intersections and pedestrian crossings to reduce delays, and provide better cycle facilities, particularly along Thorndon Quay.

We want businesses to thrive, and we know how important Hutt Road is for access to the ferry terminals, CentrePort and central Wellington. We’ll be working with the local community, and the people who travel through these roads, to make sure that the options we develop take into consideration the needs of all road users.

We’ll then ask for feedback on options in early 2021. The project team can be contacted via email at tqhr@lgwm.nz.

Timeline

May-June 2020

Have your say on the key issues

Early 2021

Have your say on options

Mid 2021

Preferred option identified

From 2022

Delivery of the preferred option begins

FAQs

Buses are often stuck in traffic along Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road, and parts of the route are poor for people cycling. The purpose of this project is to make travel by bus faster and a more reliable choice for people travelling to and through the central city; and provide a safer environment for people walking and on bikes. This includes creating a better connection for people biking between the city and the planned Te Ara Tupua Ngauranga to Petone walking and cycling link.

Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road is the busiest bus route outside the city centre, with over 6,000 people on buses travelling through on an average day), and the busiest route for people biking to and from work with up to 1,300 people biking through on an average day.

During the morning peak (two hour period between 7am and 9am on a weekday), there are between 200-400 cyclists travelling along Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road. The number of buses on the road peaks at approximately 40 vehicles per hour, with approximately 13 buses per hour during off-peak. The morning peak (7am to 9am on a weekday) has the highest bus usage, peaking at around 2,800 passengers, the majority of which are passengers travelling towards the CBD.

Wellington City Council have previously undertaken a number of projects on Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road, primarily focussing on cycleways and shared footpaths. We’ve taken the feedback from these projects on board, and also identified some new issues we think need to be considered in the design of options for improvements to Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road.

This project considers both Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road together as one route. The priorities of this project are public transport (buses), cycling and walking facilities.

The key issues identified through previous projects and by the project team have been grouped into the following themes.

  • Public transport (buses)- Buses are often stuck behind cars, making travelling by bus slow and unreliable
  • Cycle facilities - The lack of safe cycling facilities along Thorndon Quay limits the attractiveness of biking to and from the city.
  • Walking and street environment - The poor quality street environment limits the attractiveness of the area as a place for people to walk, shop and spend time in.
  • Crossings - Thorndon Quay is incredibly busy on a weekday, with large numbers of people walking through and crossing - particularly at Moore Street, Mulgrave Street and Bunny Street. Better, safer crossings are needed.
  • Parking - Angled Parking is challenging for drivers to safely exit when the road is busy and when other parked vehicles are obscuring their vision. This can make it unsafe for people on bikes, and for other vehicles on the road. The proportion of carparks allocated to long-stay parking is higher than other parking needs.
  • Volume of traffic and speed of vehicles - Thorndon Quay and Hutt Road have high volumes of traffic, particularly people driving alone to and from work. Speed limits vary along the route, increasing the likelihood and severity of crashes on Hutt Road in particular.
  • Ngauranga / Jarden Mile Interchange - This interchange is a complex intersection with no safe crossing for people walking or biking.
  • Ferry and Port access - Hutt Road is a critical access link to the Interislander Ferry Terminal. It is also a secondary route for access to CentrePort, central Wellington and the State Highway network. This increases the volume and type of vehicles using these roads.

We’ll start by asking for your input on the key problems on these roads in late May. Later in the year, we’ll share options for your feedback. If you would like to keep in touch with our progress (including when the options are available for public feedback), please sign up for our newsletter updates here. Or, if you prefer, follow our Facebook page for updates https://www.facebook.com/getwellymoving/

The business case, which includes identification of the preferred option will be completed by the end of 2020. Once we confirm the preferred option, we’ll be able to start planning the changes from early 2021.

The Ngauranga / Jarden Mile Interchange is a complex intersection which currently does not have any facilities for people walking or on bikes to cross safely. We are looking at how this intersection can be improved for buses, and for people walking and cycling, as part of the project.

Improving this intersection will also help connections to the Te Ara Tupua (Wellington to Hutt Valley walking and cycling link) project which is currently underway. The Ngauranga to Petone section is currently in the consenting and design phase. Work has started on the Petone to Melling section with construction of the underpass beneath the rail at Parliament Street due to take place soon. You can find out more about this Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency project at https://www.nzta.govt.nz/projects/te-ara-tupua/